November 11, 2010

Beetles shaped as a bee

Posted in creationism, Curioso, darwinism, evolution, intelligent design, Zoology at 10:07 am by Bram Janssen


This is a bunch of beetle larva trying to look like a bee. Why? Because they want to attract a real bee, hitch a ride to the hyve so they can gorge themselves on all the riches that are present there.

Don’t believe me?

check for yourself: Parasite of the Day: November 9 – Meloe franciscanus.

May 28, 2009

Fitting advertisement on American Thinker dot com

Posted in Conservatism, Curioso, Personal Ramblings, Philosophy & Politics, Sociology tagged , , , , at 9:16 pm by Bram Janssen

Here’s just something for a quick giggle. Notice the extremely cleverly placed advertisement on the right side of this page on AmericanThinker.com

Fitting ad on americanthinker.com

Fitting ad on americanthinker.com

January 23, 2008

The amazing Kinoki footpads!

Posted in Curioso, Personal Ramblings, scamming, Sociology at 12:15 pm by Bram Janssen

I can understand how this commercial seems convincing to someone who doesn’t know the first thing about the human body– but I bet that last you checked, toxins weren’t exiting your body through your feet. Unless you were talking about my smelly feet, which are highly toxic, especially at the end of a busy day. Wait… maybe this thing does work! In which case I might start thinking about developing some highly effective Kinoki armpit pads.

June 24, 2007

Conspiracy theories and what they are to me

Posted in conspiracy theory, Curioso at 5:17 pm by Bram Janssen

Let’s face it: conspiracy theories are incredibly entertaining. They make the appealing promise to completely throw your life upside down. Do you feel unsatisfied with your job, family or society as a whole? Well, then let us blame someone else for it!

To me, that’s what conspiracy theories are: escapism. Escape from common sense, and escape from the responsibility for making your own life work well. I could never take them seriously. Whether we’re talking about UFO’s, government-planned terrorist attacks, or – the latest big thing – chemtrails, the main motive behind their popularity seems to be wishful thinking. Not wishing sectas thrust anal probes into hapless abductees. Not wishing the United States government sent thousands of people into a fiery and violent end. Not wishing for global chemical brainwashing. But wishing that, geez, there’s something more in this life than suburbia, eternal boredom and science.

That said: they entertain me immensely. Sometimes they make me sad (9/11 conspiracies), sometimes they make me shake my head with disbelief (chemtrails) and sometimes they give me belly laughs (people mistaking the moon for a flying craft). And so I keep track of them.

Everyone’s entitled to a couple of guilty pleasures, right?